Stress management for women in agriculture

2020-12-29T12:11:15-05:00December 29, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Troy Bishopp

NYFarmNet Personal Consultant Brenda O’Brien cited a common occurrence among women involved in agriculture today: “Sometimes you don’t realize you’re actually drowning when you’re trying to be everyone else’s anchor.” The recognition and managing of myriad daily stressors was the focus of a virtual collaborative effort by Annie’s Project, Cornell Cooperative Extension and NYFarmNet to help women through the health, emotional and financial challenges on the farm. (more…)

Tracking heifer growth for optimum mammary development

2020-12-18T10:33:45-05:00December 18, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Sally Colby

Now that heifers are no longer relegated to an old shed on the edge of the property and fed whatever the milking herd refuses, they’re performing up to their genetic potential starting with their first lactation. But managing heifers for optimum milk production still requires careful attention to growth throughout calfhood and through at least two lactations. (more…)

Planning ahead for proper sampling

2020-12-11T02:53:35-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Courtney Llewellyn

Regularly testing your soil to make sure it’s performing as best as it can is important, but so is testing the manure you spread as fertilizer. Mahmoud Sharara, waste management Extension specialist with North Carolina State University, shares the best management practices for sampling manure. (more…)

Honey stings Big Sugar

2020-12-18T10:07:57-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Troy Bishopp

Whether you put a teaspoon of clover honey in your tea, stir some in your oatmeal cookie recipe or enjoy a good mead, you’re supporting local beekeeping family businesses that pollinate plants and nourish a nation. In a bit of good news, Mother Nature’s worker bees have claimed the number one spot among Americans as their most preferred sweetener – stinging the “Big Sugar” industry. (more…)

Marketing local meat

2020-12-11T03:01:17-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Tamara Scully

Those who wish to purchase food grown locally are most familiar with produce. Fruit and vegetables sold by the roadside are a hallmark of locally grown food. Produce is the low-hanging fruit of local food consumption. Even so, luring customers away from supermarket purchases of imported or well-traveled produce, which is always in season, isn’t easy. (more…)

Assessing woods necessary for maple production

2020-12-11T02:55:14-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

If you would like to add making maple syrup as part of your agricultural business, it’s vital to assess the health of your forest. New York State Extension Forester Peter Smallidge presented “Evaluating the Potential of a Site for the Commercial Production of Maple Sap” as a recent webinar hosted by Cornell Cooperative Extension and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (more…)

Milk check mysteries: Depooling and distress

2020-12-29T11:33:41-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Tamara Scully

Dr. Chris Wolf recently explained just how dairy farmers actually get paid. The mysteries behind the milk check were found to be threefold: the Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) uniform (or blend) price, regional order differences and farm level concerns such as components and milk hauling costs. They all have an effect on the final milk check received. (more…)

Keeping it up front with H-2A

2020-12-18T09:14:42-05:00December 11, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Sally Colby

Many farms wouldn’t have an adequate labor force without the presence of H-2A workers. L.G. D’Arrigo, co-leader of the immigration practice at Harris Beach in Albany, NY, said there isn’t a reliable supply of labor in the U.S., and part of that is because the American government is concerned about whether U.S. workers are available to fill positions. (more…)