Crop Comments: Harnessing the Fringe

2020-08-13T13:14:04-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

There are at least a couple options for planting forages that really put to good use the cooler conditions that surround Indian Summer in the Northeast. The best time to plant these “packages,” seldom just a single species, is the middle 10 days of August. The question then is where to plant these. Many folks were able to get 75- to 80-day corn planted more or less on time, despite a chilly, drawn-out April. According to my April electric bill statement, the average temperature in Otsego County was 41º F. Throughout April 2020, the only crops that looked good were late summer/early fall-planted small grains/winter forages. (more…)

Survey finds two-thirds of NY farms negatively impacted by COVID-19

2020-08-13T12:47:31-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition, Western Edition|

by Courtney Llewellyn

More than 500 New York Farm Bureau members participated in a survey in mid-June that asked how the coronavirus pandemic and the subsequent shutdown of the New York economy affected both their bottom lines and their mental health. The survey found that 65% of the respondents’ farms and businesses were negatively impacted financially by COVID-19. (more…)

Crop Comments: Another dynamic duo

2020-08-13T12:46:57-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

Mid-spring 1977, in my role as agronomy cooperative extension agent for Otsego County, I attended a field crop demonstration at one of Cornell’s off-campus research facilities. Several agronomy professors were stationed at their own demonstration sites. These educators would explain the details of their experiments to guests, mostly farmers. The presentation that I remember best was given by Robert Seaney, PhD. (more…)

First generation dairy farmers Unc Brock

2020-08-13T12:44:33-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition|

by Katie Navarra

At a time when many second and third generation dairy farm kids left the family business, Kris and Unc Brock jumped in with both feet. Kris was working at an optometrist’s office and Unc had a trucking business. The couple had been around cows as kids and thought a small dairy operation would make an ideal retirement gig. (more…)

Crop Comments: Trendy cereal grain has black-sheep weed cousin

2020-08-13T12:20:29-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

The Veterans Administration Medical Service is very concerned about the physical (as well as mental) well being of former Armed Forces personnel. As a member of this distinguished group, I qualify for many medical benefits. One such benefit is the counseling service of a licensed dietician. The VA believes that a healthy diet helps veterans avoid becoming inpatients at their hospitals. In a tele-health visit this past February (before COVID-19 made such medical regimen part of the “new normal”), I met with such a dietician: she at the VA Hospital in Albany — myself at the VA clinic in Bainbridge, NY. I explained my diet to her, mentioning that every other day my breakfast consists of a blend of oatmeal and grits… both organic (she liked that). (more…)

Adirondack Beef Company

2020-08-13T12:02:21-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition|

  by Katie Navarra

There are only nine stoplights in Lewis County, NY. There are also twice as many cows as people, according to Steve Ledoux. The rural area not far from the military base in Fort Drum relies on agriculture – specifically maple syrup, dairy and logging. Ledoux and his wife Michele are among the region’s farm families, though they specialize in beef, pork and poultry at their Adirondack Beef Company based in Croghan. (more…)

Prices paid to dairy farmers are a disaster

2020-08-13T11:53:53-05:00August 13, 2020|Eastern Edition|

One more time, dairy farmers thought their pay price would really rebound when they were told the Class III price (used to make cheese) for June was going to be $21.04 per cwt. (hundred pounds). If all milk was priced correctly, then the $21.04 would be great news. However, even though the Class III price rose by leaps and bounds, the Class II and IV prices stayed stagnant.   However, the big boomer is the fact the Class I price, which is supposed to be the highest price, for June was only $14.67 per cwt. (more…)