Grow Food Northampton

CN-MR-3-CRIMSON-CLOVER_14041by Laura Rodley

If you want to farm, the nonprofit Grow Food Northampton can help. Right now, the nonprofit oversees three farms on some 120 acres. The three leasable spots are on Crimson and Clover, Sawmill Farm and Slow Tractor Farm.

“We’re full,” said Clem Clay, the Executive Director of Grow Food. Currently, 103 acres are already leased, seven acres are designated as organic and all 275 garden plot areas are taken. [Read more…]

Farm Credit East annual customer meetings salute 100 year history and focus on the future

Enfield, CT — Farm Credit East’s annual customer appreciation meetings began in October. At this year’s meetings, the member-owned cooperative will update customers on Farm Credit East and commence efforts to celebrate the 100 year anniversary of Farm Credit.

The theme of this year’s meeting is “A 100 Year Foundation to Support our Customers and Communities into the Future.” It recognizes the cooperative’s history and long-term commitment to serve agriculture, commercial fishing and forest products businesses.
[Read more…]

Giant pumpkins and watermelons compete at State Fair

CM-NC-2-GIANTS-STATE-FAI#CC1RALEIGH, NC — A 948-pound pumpkin grown by Gail Newsom in Pinnacle and a 302-pound watermelon grown by Chris “Superman” Kent from Sevierville, TN took the top prizes in the Great Pumpkin and Watermelon Weigh-Off at the NC State Fair. This event is sanctioned by the Great Pumpkin Commonwealth, an international organization that promotes growing giant vegetables. [Read more…]

A dismal fall for crops in the Carolinas and Virginia

CM-MR-NC-3-DISMAL-SEASON#C31by Chris Bickers

As farmers gathered at the North Carolina State Fair, there was much bemoaning of the bad weather that has characterized this season right up until fair time. In fact, the Sunday after the Fair began on Oct. 16, a killing frost set in, followed by another the following morning.

The frost varied in its severity from north to south, with the growing season for cold-sensitive crops essentially coming to an end. The continuous rains had already marred the late season at the beginning of October. [Read more…]

Turning a profit with Jersey milk

CM-MR-3-JERSEY-CHEESE_011by Sally Colby

When Karen Mickler and her husband Bruce DeGroot purchased a remote 50-acre mountain farm in Robbinsville, NC in 1980, they planned to produce as much food for themselves as they could. Part of that plan included a Jersey cow by the name of Rosebud.

“We didn’t buy this land with the intention of having a dairy farm,” said Karen. “We bought one milk cow, Rosebud, but she gave so much milk that we learned to make cheese. We had so much cheese and then another cow, so we got a license to sell our cheese.” [Read more…]