Organic Grain Markets

by Tamara Scully

The demand for organic corn, soy, and wheat for both feed and food markets is increasing. According to United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service’s data, organic corn acreage has increased 24 percent since 2011. Soy has shown a modest three percent increase during this same time. While organic wheat acreage decreased by three percent, overall wheat acreage in the United States also declined during that timeframe. [Read more…]

Keystone Farm Show gears up for their biggest year ever

CDM-PP-Keystone-171With the addition of a toy exhibit area and the expansion into an additional building, the Keystone Farm Show is cementing its status as being the largest farm equipment and service provider trade show in Pennsylvania.

The show, now entering its 18th year, is the first farm show of the year and has the largest number of agriculture exhibitors on the East Coast. [Read more…]

Opportunity for dairy farms: Raising bull calves

CDM-MR-2-BULL-CALVES_66w6by Katie Navarra

If you are thinking about adding a new profitable enterprise to your dairy operation, dairy-beef production could be a natural fit.
“Sometimes it is hard to convince dairy farmers that they are also beef farmers. After all, think about where the cows go at the end of their life. The better care they receive, the higher value they will have at that point,” said Tom Gallagher, livestock specialist, Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program.

[Read more…]

Friesians of Majesty at 2015 Friesians of Majesty FPZV-USA at Equine Affaire and the Benefits of Imprinting


Ducklings imprint themselves on their mother ducks when they hatch so they know how to eat, how to swim and what to fear in order to survive in this world, both in the wild and domesticated on farms. Licensed breeder, Robert Labrie of Townshend, VT, owner of Friesians of Majesty FPZV-USA, imprints his foals to himself when they are born. This lessens their innate fear of people. He is working on getting his process patented. [Read more…]

Maine prepares for impending outbreak of spruce budworm

CN-RP-1-ME-BUDWORM-11Maine Forest Service report documents steady rise of native defoliator

AUGUSTA, MA — The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) recently released its 2015 report on spruce budworm in Maine. Entomologists from the DACF’s Maine Forest Service note a steady rise in the numbers of insects caught in pheromone traps concentrated along the Canadian border. Quebec’s infestation now encompasses 15.6 million acres and has spread south onto the Gaspe Peninsula and toward Maine. The insect’s potential to become an outbreak over vast regions of commercially valuable spruce-fir forests has scientists and public official deeply concerned. An infestation can spread rapidly via moths migrating to new areas. [Read more…]