More animal protein needed by mid century

by George Looby

The National Research Council has come forth with the recommendation that there is a need for a greater investment to support additional research in the area of animal science. This investment is needed to meet the anticipated increase in the global demand for animal protein by mid century. Not only will there be an increase in demand but also that it be produced in an economical and sustainable way. It might be said that sustainability is an effort to minimize the adverse effects of human activity by implementing practices that more friendly to the environment in all areas where humans are the major disruptive force. Something as simple as replacing incandescent bulbs and turning off lights when not in use would be a relatively painless way to start such program.

Addressing the need for more animal protein world-wide in the traditional, time honored way is probably not the answer, thus the need to seek alternative methods from those now in place in many of more advanced countries of the world. [Read more…]

VA No-Till meeting once again brings good crowds

CM-MR-3-VA-NO-TILL-4by Karl H. Kazaks

Harrisonburg, VA – The Virginia No-Till Alliance held its 6th annual conference in early February. Like last year, the meeting was held first at the Rockingham County Fairgrounds and then repeated, with a few variations, the following day at the Olde Dominion Ag Complex in Chatham. About 300 people attended the event’s first day, and a good crowd was on hand in Chatham, too. On both days, farmers and ag professionals from around Virginia gathered to listen to featured speakers, enjoy fellowship with each other, and take in information at trade shows.

Jason Geesaman, of Cullen, was at the Harrisonburg event. “I learned a lot about cover crops,” he said. Jason and his father Sam, who was also present at the meeting, raise, cattle, hay, row crops, and broilers for Tyson. “What I’m learning about cover crops is to plant shorter season corn,” Sam said. “Last year we did cut back on maturity,” and the approach was successful – they were able to get cover crops established behind the early season corn. [Read more…]

Cattle feeders learn more about finishing cattle

CEWM-MR-4-Cattle feeders8by Jon M. Casey

For the 160 attendees that attended this year’s Lancaster Cattle Feeders Day, there was a lot to learn about how grading and labeling of beef takes place. With PSU Retired Extension Economist, Lou Moore leading the way, Dr. Ty Lawrence, director of the Beef Carcass Research Center at West Texas A&M University and Dr. Jonathan Campbell, Penn State Meat Extension Specialist, together put on what this writer considers one of the most interesting cattle feeder days in recent memory. They touched on everything from the state of the current U.S. and World Ag economies to meat product labeling. Dr. Lawrence focused on how to finish beef cattle to receive the best sale price for the effort. Together, these three experts gave an informative overview, covering everything from what goes into Nathan’s Hot Dogs to the political wranglings of foreign nations as they deal with U.S. farmers. At the end of the day, there was much to contemplate. [Read more…]

Establishing a safety culture

CEWM-CN-MR-2-Safety Culture9804by Sally Colby

Dairy farmer Walt Moore says prior to 2007, his farm had several workers compensation claims. “We had one really big one,” he said. “The herd manager was injured while moving a heifer. He came back in limited capacity, but was never able to fully return to work.”

After several more claims, Moore’s rates went up. Eventually, his insurance company decided that the farm was a high risk and dropped them. “We had to go with the state workers program,” said Moore, adding that he had to stay with that program for three years. “The rates are substantially higher than commercial insurance.” [Read more…]

Is drone technology for farmers just around the corner?

CEW-MR-2-Oneida-Congress7021by Pat Malin

CLINTON, NY — Many American farmers have readily adopted GPS technology and can appreciate the uses of computers throughout the farm and around the home, but are they ready for the next wave of technology?

Enter drones. Even if you are ready, hold onto your hat. Drones are not merely toys, but neither are they the fearsome military vehicles you’ve seen on the TV news.

Jeff Miller of Oneida County Cornell Cooperative Extension enlightened farmers about the use of these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or systems (UAS) during the 2015 Oneida County Crop Congress, sponsored by Clinton Tractor. [Read more…]