Promoting native bee pollinators in organic farming systems

by Katie Navarra

Honey bees are the most widely known pollinator species. However, recent research shows there are numerous pollinator species and that the more diverse the species the increased pollination benefits. “There are thousands of bee species, some are solitary, some nest in the ground, others in twigs and trees,” explained David Crowder, Assistant Professor of Entomology at Washington State University. [Read more…]

Veterans: Beginning farmer education

CW-MR-1-VETERANS_1849by Sanne Kure-Jensen

Agricultural training programs designed for veterans should include plenty of hands-on experiences for this high-energy group. Norm Conrad, Northeast Director of the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) strongly suggests having extra materials on-hand as well as an extra group exercise or activity in the curriculum. Veterans are often more focused, productive and efficient than other workshop attendees.

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Promoting native bee pollinators in organic farming systems

by Katie Navarra

Honey bees are the most widely known pollinator species. However, recent research shows there are numerous pollinator species and that the more diverse the species the increased pollination benefits. “There are thousands of bee species, some are solitary, some nest in the ground, others in twigs and trees,” explained David Crowder, Assistant Professor of Entomology at Washington State University.

During an eOrganic webinar, Crowder and Elias Bloom, a Ph.D. student in Entomology working in Crowder’s lab, discussed the diversity of native bees in farming systems and the roles they may play in supplement or replacing honey bees for pollination services. [Read more…]

New Hampshire recognizes UNH Fairchild Dairy as quality milk producer

CN-DY-1-FAIRCHILD-DAIRY01DURHAM, NH — The Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center, a facility of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station (NHAES) at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture (COLSA), has been recognized by the state as a New Hampshire Quality Milk Producer. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services cited the farm’s efforts for 2014. The dairy farm had an average inspection score of 96 out of 100, and excellent scores related to animal health. [Read more…]

Stay safe when handling sheep

CM-MR-2-Stay-safe625by Sally Colby

It’s hard to imagine that sheep dotting a green pasture could cause any harm, but there are plenty of ways to become injured while working with sheep. It’s important to understand the basics of how and why sheep move the way they do to prevent injuries to both humans and animals. Any time a sheep is separated from its group is an opportunity for injury to the handler or the sheep.

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