Benefits of cover crops

by Sanne Kure-Jensen

More and more growers are planting cover crops to improve soil moisture, reduce erosion and maximize profits. Cover crops can include grasses, legumes and forbs planted for seasonal cover. Over time, using cover crops improves yields, organic matter and soil water conservation. This change is most noticable with diverse crop rotation. [Read more…]

New cover crop termination policy

CN-MR-1-New cover crop 1by Sanne Kure-Jensen

Cover crops are gaining popularity as a way to improve soils, drought resistance and cash crop yields. Grasses, legumes and forbs can be used as cover crops. To protect crop insurance eligibility, farmers must understand and carefully follow the NRCS Cover Crop Termination Guidelines including the termination periods. [Read more…]

CNY CCE 2014 Calf Health and Nutrition Conference: shaping her future

CEW-MR-3-Calf Health3by Elizabeth A. Tomlin

“When we think about why we have so many calf health challenges, it can come down to those first few hours of life,” stated Dairy Specialist Dr. Kimberley Morrill.

Morrill joined with Dr. Fernando Soberon in a presentation for the 2014 Calf Health and Nutrition Conference put on by Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Central New York Dairy and Field Crops Team.

Morrill and Soberon presented updated information concerning the critical importance of colostrum to every newborn calf. [Read more…]

Quintuplet meat goats born at SUNY Cobleskill

CEW-MR-2-Quintuplet goats288by Brad Johnson, Assistant Professor of Animal Science, SUNY Cobleskill

The Stork has been working overtime at SUNY Cobleskill, with the delivery of quintuplet meat goat kids on March 12. The litter of kids weighed a total of 27.3 pounds and includes two doe kids, weighing 3.1 and 4.1 pounds, and three buck kids, a bit more hefty, weighing in at 5.1, 6.9, and 8.1 pounds. The solid white doe, a Kiko-sired crossbred, and her litter of kids, all born unassisted, have been affectionately named Snow White and the Five Dwarfs. [Read more…]

Poultry panel discusses cooperation

CEW-MR-1-Poultry panel5by Tamara Scully

Cornell Cooperative Extension recently presented a poultry marketing meeting, which addressed whether pastured poultry producers may best be served through some form of cooperative system: for marketing; processing; purchasing inputs; or even frozen product storage space.

CCE of St. Lawrence County has obtained a grant, from the Northeast Center for Risk Management Education, to study the production of chicken in hoop houses, in an effort to scale-up poultry production in Northern New York State. Betsy Hodge, CCE Livestock Educator, is involved with the project, along with extension agent Brent Buchanan. [Read more…]