Managing pests of herb and vegetable bedding plants

 by Katie Navarra

“Biological control programs use living organisms that are natural enemies of insects to control pests and diseases,” said Leanne Pundt, Extension Educator for University of Connecticut at the Litchfield County Extension Center.

“They do not act as quickly as pesticides, so cannot be used as a rescue treatment. Natural enemies are best used preventatively, early in the cropping cycle, when plants are small, pest numbers are low and pest damage has not yet occurred,” she added.

Biological controls also reduce worker exposure to pesticide and pesticide residues, limits spray damage, requires limited equipment for application and improves plant quality. Integrating biological controls also lengthens the lifespan of effective pesticides used in greenhouses by reducing opportunity for the development of resistance. [Read more…]

Letter to the Editor: NYS Corn and Soybean Growers

As members of the board of directors of the New York Corn & Soybean Growers Association, Inc. (Association), we feel compelled to respond to letters that have recently appeared in this publication related to our decision to search for a new executive director of the Association.

While we are restricted in discussing personnel matters, please know that circumstances over a period of time necessitated the board to make a change at the executive director level. This decision was made with full board support and was made in the best interests of all New York corn and soybean growers. [Read more…]

2015 CNY Small Grain Workshop ~ Part 3

CEW-MR-1-Small Grain pt3by Elizabeth A. Tomlin

Dr. Gary Bergstorm, Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences School of Integrative Plant Science Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, spoke to attendees at the 2015 CNY Small Grain Workshop about identifying and controlling some common diseases in small grains. [Read more…]

Chemical residues in dairy and beef

by Tamara Scully

Drug residues, from antibiotics or other chemicals being given to livestock, are found in milk as well as in beef. These chemicals are “certainly problematic. If there’s a residue, then somehow that chemical got into the food,” Dr. Dwight Bruno, BSc, DVM, New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets said in a recent PRO-DAIRY workshop addressing milk quality. The workshop — the third in a three-part series held this winter — was broadcast live to various viewing locations throughout the state.

One hundred percent of repeat violators — those with more than one instance of drug residue in milk and/or in beef animals — in New York State in 2014 were cited for neomycin or other drugs in veal calves, Bruno said. This could be directly correlated to feeding bob veal calves medicated milk replacer. [Read more…]

Veterans: Beginning farmer education

CN-MR-1-VETERANS_1849by Sanne Kure-Jensen

Agricultural training programs designed for veterans should include plenty of hands-on experiences for this high-energy group. Norm Conrad, Northeast Director of the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) strongly suggests having extra materials on-hand as well as an extra group exercise or activity in the curriculum. Veterans are often more focused, productive and efficient than other workshop attendees. [Read more…]