Finally, the truth about milk and milk products

For nearly 50 years, many dairy farmers have been waiting for some reputable sources to document and tell the truth about the real value of milk and list the reasons why the average American consumer should consume more milk and dairy products.

It makes you wonder where the advertising experts and research people have been. These are the ones that dairy farmers diligently continue to fund.

On June 23, the large Time magazine carried an eight page article concerning the safety of using milk and milk products. (yes, I said Time magazine!) The article was composed by Mr. Bryan Walsh. Walsh starts his article by saying “Don’t blame fat.” For decades, it has been the most vilified nutrient in the American diet. But new science reveals fat isn’t what is hurting our health. [Read more…]

Purposeful pasture pruning

CEW-MR-1-Purposeful pastureby Troy Bishopp

On June 9, 2010 my friend, grazing customer, mentor and fiercely independent farmer, David Huse tragically died when his tractor and mower were hit by a car on his way to help a neighbor.

At his funeral I recollect writing this passage: “A large, skylight provided a mottled scene over my friend’s casket, as I sat in the pew at St. Vincent de Paul’s Church in Cobleskill clutching a little farmscape card with the 23rd Psalm on it. I heard and felt the words from the pastor and David’s brothers, all the while looking up at the view of the sky in an attempt to hold in all the emotion I was feeling. It was during the singing of Amazing Grace that I noticed the portal filled with sun, shining through a crystal clear blue sky. My eyes and heart couldn’t hold back the flood.” [Read more…]

Growing up with Herefords

CW-MR-3-Locust Lane308by Sally Colby

Chris Dermody grew up with Belgian draft horses and cattle, but recalls that the horses were just too big when he was young. “I liked cows,” said Chris. “My parents got me two Hereford heifers when I was eight, and I got started in 4-H. Then I had a steer project, and started to build a herd.”

As Chris learned how to raise and show cattle, he also developed an eye for quality. “At the start, I listened to what everyone was telling me,” he said. “By the time I was 12, I was into looking up bulls on my own. We got our own tank so we could order semen from the bulls I thought would make the best crosses.” [Read more…]

Managing weeds in hay fields

CEWN-MR-1-Managing1585by Sally Colby

Hay is an important crop for livestock producers, and should be treated the same as any other crop when it comes to weed control. Weedy hay results in decreased yields, short-lived stands and potential harmful effects to livestock.

Weeds in forages compete for nutrients, light moisture and space. They reduce the quality of forage, and intake may be influenced. In a pasture setting, cattle often eat both desirable and undesirable species, and can possibly ingest harmful or injurious portions of plants. Some weeds are toxic when dried with hay, and although cattle can usually sort out weeds in straight dry hay, weeds contained in large bales that are chopped and mixed with a ration are nearly impossible to sort. [Read more…]

WBB Farm

CW-MR-1-WBB Farm06by Katie Navarra

Despite not having any children or grandchildren participating in this year’s Junior Nationals event, Warren (Jr.) and wife, Brenda, Bippert, owners of WBB Farm in Alden, NY, are ecstatic the event will be held in Harrisburg, PA, July 5-12.

Over 600 junior exhibitors from 36 states will travel to Harrisburg to participate. “This is the first time Junior Nationals has been in the East, ever!” Brenda noted, “it’s exciting to get the kids from out west here to see how different it is to raise cattle here in this climate.”
Aside from this being the first year Junior Nationals have been on the East Coast, the Bipperts have a special interest in this year’s competition. James Held from Orchard Park, NY will be showing his cattle at the event. [Read more…]