Growing canola as a component of dairy feed

CM-CN-MR-2-Growing canola1766by Sally Colby

A field of bright yellow canola is a pretty sight, although most people don’t know what it is when they see it. The terms canola and rapeseed are often used interchangeably, but they aren’t the same crop.

Canola is essentially improved rapeseed. Rapeseed contains high levels of certain compounds that make it unpalatable to livestock. In the early 1970s, after improving the palatability, oil quality and protein level, the crop became known as canola. To be called canola, the crop must test below established levels for erucic acid and glucosinolates; the two undesirable compounds in rapeseed. The term ‘canola’ comes from the term ‘Canadian oil’. [Read more…]

The many hats of Rocky and Marilyn Lively

CN-MR-3-Sunrise1by Laura Rodley

Rockwell, best known as Rocky, and Marilyn Lively own Sunrise Farms in Colrain, MA. Like all farmers, they both wear many hats. Rocky raises hormone- and chemical-free grass-fed beef, produces maple syrup and builds houses out of lumber sawn at the sawmill run by his son, Jordan Lively, on the 500-acre farm. His son Erik Lively, a resident of Greenfield, comes every day to work at the farm. They are all partners, and the farms’ sole employees. They are members of Community in Sustainable Agriculture, (CISA), which assists and promotes local farmers. [Read more…]

Connecticut’s “Outstanding Dairy Farm of the Year”

CN-MR-3-GreenPastures2by Lorraine Strenkowski

Jeff and Alexis Cone of Lebanon, CT have been named the “Outstanding Dairy Farm of the Year 2014,” by the New England Green Pastures program. This award is presented annually to one farm in each of the six New England states.

Green Pastures started back in 1947 with New Hampshire challenging the other New England states to produce better pastures than their own. With the growing dairy industry, this annual competition evolved into a program that not only considered pasture quality and forage management, but also the farm family, production, herd/milk quality, financial stability and community involvement. [Read more…]

Using copper oxide wire particles to help control barber pole worms on Northeast sheep and goat farms

CN-SR-MR-3-Using Cooper 1cDr. Tatiana Stanton, Cornell Sheep and Goat Program

Barber pole worm (Haemonchus contortus) is the most serious parasite problem on pasture-based Northeast goat and sheep farms. Copper oxide wire particles (COWP) have effectively reduced infection of barber pole worm in studies in the Southeast US, but it is not clear how safe and effective they are in the Northeast. Therefore, Cornell University has embarked on a three-year study to look at methods for incorporating COWP into Northeast parasite control programs.

Copper oxide wire particles were developed to treat copper deficiencies in livestock in regions where copper is not readily available in soil and forages. Because of this important role, they are already approved for organic farming and may prove to be an important new tool for both organic and conventional farms. They are administered to livestock in the form of gel capsules with a dosing syringe (Figure 1). [Read more…]

FFA and Vo-Ag’s year-end festivities

CN-MR-1-Miss Agby Lorraine Strenkowski

Lebanon Regional Agricultural Science & Technology Center, located at Lyman Memorial High School in Lebanon, CT, finished up their year in style. First, came the “Miss Ag” Competition, in which five lovely candidates competed for the title. Each lady had to compete in four categories: their own introduction, an explanation of their Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE), their talent and an answer to an individual question. [Read more…]