Three-generation family farm thrives in Maine’s dairy center

CN-MR-2-ThreeGenby Sally Colby

When Jenni Tilton-Flood talks about Flood Brothers Farm, she prefers to leave numbers out of the conversation.

“There’s a lot of variation in herd size within the state,” said Jenni, who wasn’t a farmer until she married Dana Flood. “We’re very proud of our approach. We’ve always felt that if we provide everything the cows need, we can make outstanding milkers out of them.” [Read more…]

Poultry raising basics

CM-MR-1-Starting poultry copyby Katie Navarra

Poultry are relatively easy to raise and do well with basic food, water and shelter.

While it’s fairly simple to raise poultry it is important to be prepared, plan ahead and do some research prior to bringing chicks or older birds to your property.

First, you’ll have to decide if you’re raising a laying flock or a broiler flock or a combination of the two.
[Read more…]

Through a vet’s eyes: your parlor at milking time

C4-MR-2-Teatsby Bill and Mary Weaver

Extension veterinarians like Dr. Ernest Hovingh get to see a lot of milking parlors over the years, and come to expect certain problems crop up. Dr. Hovingh has seen ways milkers could, but often don’t, prevent parlor-acquired mastitis. Let’s look at this potentially costly problem. [Read more…]

Dolloff Acres Farm named Vermont Dairy Farm of Year

CN-MR-3-VTDairyFarm3by Lisa Halvorsen, Freelance Agricultural Journalist for UVM Extension

In an era when many farmers are going bigger to survive, Mike and Heidi Dolloff have kept cow numbers and milk quality consistent, which helps ensure their 160-cow Holstein farm in Springfield, VT, remains both sustainable and profitable. They pay meticulous attention to detail, whether in selection of herd genetics or improving crop yields or cow comfort, never losing sight of their goal to keep this a viable family farm they can pass onto the next generation. [Read more…]

Success of Connecticut’s young farmers

CN-MR-3-SuccessCTby Lorraine Strenkowski

The Future Farmers of America has been traditionally linked to Vocational Agricultural centers in our high schools. According to www.ffa.org, 91 percent of FFA members are currently enrolled in grades 9-12, and are “challenged to real-life, hands-on tests of skills used to prepare them for more than 300 careers in the agriculture industry.” The National FFA Organization also puts a high priority on leadership, business, social and speaking skills. [Read more…]