Healthy keys to chicken success

CN-MR-1-Chicken-success1by Paul Burdziakowski

Having a small flock of chickens is a growing trend in countries around the world. Country folks are not the only ones taking up this hobby. Many cities are relaxing their laws and ordinances when it comes to owning chickens so urban dwellers are now a part of this phenomenon.

When it comes to knowledge on topic of poultry professor Michael Darre of the University of Connecticut is one of the top experts in all of New England. Darre holds a PH.D. in Environmental Animal Physiology and has taught introductory poultry courses at Connecticut’s most esteemed university since 1981. In addition Darre is also the lead Cooperative Extension poultry specialist for the New England area. Being a part of the Extension allows Darre to work closely with professionals in the commercial poultry industry as well as children who are involved in programs such as 4-H. [Read more…]

Dairy goat management

Herd health program for dairy goats

An effective animal health program is an essential part of a successful dairy goat management program. Good feeding and breeding will not result in maximum production if goats are not kept in good health.

Since each herd is different, you should work with a veterinarian to create a herd health plan. Keep good records for each animal regarding medications, vaccinations, dewormers, injuries, production, breeding, and culling. Use this information to plan your herd health program. Prevention with a good herd health plan is usually less expensive than treating disease. [Read more…]

Chase Hill Farm

CN-MR-46-3-Chase-Hill41by Laura Rodley

In France, the Normande breed of cattle with their dark brown checkerboard coats dot the landscape, the way that black and white Holsteins dotted the New England landscape when farmer Mark Fellows grew up in Warwick, MA. The Normandes are dual purpose, bred for both high quality beef and bred for producing the best milk for cheese production.

Fellows was well acquainted with Holsteins as he grew up on his parents’ dairy. Oliver and Virginia Fellows started farming in 1950 on land that had a house and views of New Hampshire’s Mt. Monadnock. They built a barn and outbuildings, but didn’t name the farm. His father laid the cinder blocks for the hay barn by hand. “They had a conventional dairy farm,” said Fellows. [Read more…]

Connecticut Vegetable and Small Fruit Growers Conference

CN-MR-CT-vegetable-and21by George Looby

In January vegetable and small fruit growers from the state and beyond gathered at Maneeley’s Conference Center in South Windsor, CT for their annual conference.

The first speakers of the day were Heather Callahan and Neley Agudelo from the U.S. Dept. of Labor who addressed the topic of how to comply with labor laws and survive a U.S. Dept. of Labor investigation. The rights of farm workers are covered under the provisions of the U.S. Dept. of Labor and cover an array of situations and conditions under which employees might find themselves. Many workers fall under the Migrant and Seasonal Ag Worker Protection Act (MSPA). Items falling under the MSPA umbrella include wages, housing, transportation, working conditions and work-related conditions. [Read more…]

Milk flow

CM-MR-1-Milk-flow11by Tamara Scully

Dairy farmers were offered the opportunity to hear from dairy economist Bob Wellington, of dairy cooperative Agri-Mark, Inc., during a teleconference through the University of Vermont Extension. Bob Parsons, UVM Extension Economist, hosted the call.

Wellington discussed the ‘chaos of the world market,’ which is ‘crucial’ to United States dairy producers as 13-14 percent of U.S.-produced milk, on a component basis, is currently exported overseas. [Read more…]