Organic, grass-fed dairy challenges

2019-02-19T11:56:46+00:00January 28, 2019|Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Tamara Scully

Heather Darby, agronomist with the University of Vermont, and Sarah Flack, grass-based livestock consultant, have been conducting research into the challenges and successes of 100 percent grass-based organic dairy farmers. Their ongoing research began in 2016, when the total number of 100 percent grass-fed dairy farms in the U.S. was estimated to be around 150. Today, that number has substantially increased, with over 400 dairy farms opting to feed no grain, and to rely on pasture forages – legumes, forbs and grass – to provide the nutrition a milking herd requires.

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Kelp supplementation and dairy cows

2019-02-22T14:47:42+00:00January 28, 2019|Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Tamara Scully

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have been exploring the use of kelp supplementation in milking cows. A survey conducted in the Northeast showed that 59 percentage of organic dairy producers are using kelp, either supplementing the ration with two to four ounces, or sometimes making it available free choice. In the Midwest, 83 percent of Minnesota organic dairy farmers, and 49 percent of Wisconsin’s organic dairy producers are using kelp.

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Miss Agriculture USA making connections across the country

2019-01-25T16:55:25+00:00January 21, 2019|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Courtney Llewellyn

County fair queens are a familiar sight, moving with their courts through crowds of fair-goers, smiling, waving and representing their realms. Dairy princesses do the same, representing milk producers in their areas. But what about those who want to share their love of agriculture as a whole?

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The year end report from the Collins Farm

2019-01-14T10:40:43+00:00January 14, 2019|New England Farm Weekly|

by George Looby

On March 29, 2018 a group of officials and interested individuals gathered at the Collins Powder Hill Farm in Enfield, CT, to review the progress that had been made on a new energy installation on the farm. This project was the result of a study initiated by the Connecticut Resource Conservation and Development Organization (CTRC&D), a non-profit, non-governmental group dedicated to the conservation of energy on Connecticut farms.

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The science of stress

2019-02-18T17:08:27+00:00January 14, 2019|Eastern Edition, Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

Part 2: Focused stress reduction strategies

by Sally Colby

Farmers are professionals when it comes to getting things done under stress, but often at the expense of their health. Because stress can be a major contributing factor in many complicated health issues, it’s worth pursuing stress-reduction strategies to avoid serious issues.

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Beef cattle transportation and welfare

2019-01-14T14:11:26+00:00January 14, 2019|Mid Atlantic, New England Farm Weekly, Western Edition|

by Tamara Scully

Transportation of livestock is a stressful event for the animals. Just ask Brianna the cow, a recent New Jersey escapee who either fell or jumped from a transport truck heading to the slaughterhouse. While events such as this aren’t common, the safety and well-being of cattle being transported – no matter the end destination – is an important concern for the livestock industry.

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