Farm Safety Tip – Hay Harvest Safety

Harvesting hay can be very dangerous: A 61-year-old catches his sweatshirt in a hay baler and is killed. A 43-year-old farmer catches his arm in the PTO of a self-unloading wagon. The amputated arm cannot be reattached because it is mangled too badly. A 57-year-old man dies of internal injuries when caught in a hay baler. A 50-year-old is crushed to death by a load of hay that topples from a farm wagon as a flat tire is being changed. An 18-year-old falls into the beaters of a self-unloading wagon. Almost two hours go by before the victim is found. [Read more…]

Dairy herd management and methane production

by Tamara Scully

Climate change has become a focus of the dairy industry, both because climate change will impact dairy herd performance and because dairy herds impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Not only do dairy farmers have to worry about protecting their cows from the impacts of climate change; they also have to worry about the carbon footprint of the herd. [Read more…]

Keeping up with the Veterinary Feed Directive ~ Part One: why do we need this?

by Sally Colby

Consumers are more aware and concerned about the use of antibiotics in livestock than ever before, and some of those concerns are valid.

Dr. Mike Apley, boarded clinical pharmacologist and professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, says that many factors led to the veterinary feed directive or VFD; a topic of much discussion lately among livestock producers.

“It all started back in the 1960s with the concerns about the use of antibiotics in feed for livestock,” said Apley. “There have been numerous reports and studies through that time, waxing and waning, and interest continues to build now.” [Read more…]

Judging the best of the best

CEW-MR-2-JUDGING-AADS_09931by Steve Wagner

The judging for Supreme Champion is a culmination of AADS events for the preceding week. Alan McCauley, AADS President, took a moment to focus on judging guidelines for this particular event, what the judges look for. “You look for straight lines, dairyness, which means angularity and not carrying a lot of excess condition,” he said. “The most important thing is probably a real sound set of feet and legs and a well attached, well balanced udder with proper teat size placement — udder and feet and legs are very, very important.” [Read more…]

Golfing success

CN-RP-2-GOLFING-SUCCESS_11Last month’s “Playing for Clover” 4-H Golf Tournament fundraiser was a success! The Grafton County 4-H Leaders’ Association collected nearly $11,000. [Read more…]