Atherton Farm

CN-MR-3-ATHERTON-FARM_7701by Laura Rodley

One of the benefits of having your farm on a busy thoroughfare is that your farmstand doesn’t need advertising, as the produce is set up and clearly visible from the road. Location is prime for Atherton Farm, owned by Susan Atherton. It’s on busy Route 112, with easy access for people to stop in. Plus, for people choosing to support sustainability, she has no commute, as she grows over 1,000 tomato plants to sell, along with hay, other produce and flowers right at the farm, so there no trucking them in or plastic packaging. [Read more…]

Pasture improvements for equine

CF4-MR-1-Pasture-improve9261Managing and maintaining pasture

by Tamara Scully

Horses need pasture. At least one percent — and preferably 1.5 percent — of their body weight, per day, should come from pasture. One horse requires between two and three acres of pasture — or hay, for maintenance needs alone. Pasture provides a healthy diet for horses, decreasing colic and reducing the incidence of gastric ulcers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [Read more…]

Don’t waste the waste

CEW-MR-3-Don't-waste65301by Sally Colby

Manure is a valuable resource, and farmers incorporate it as part of their farm’s nutrient management plan. Manure spreader calibration is an essential and valuable nutrient management tool that helps maximize the efficient use of available manure nutrients. [Read more…]

New England Juniors shine at National Holstein Convention

CN-MR-1-HOLSEIN-CON011by Erin Norris

This past June 13 New England Juniors traveled to the National Holstein Convention in St. Charles, IL. The National Holstein Convention takes place every year in different states around the country. The New England Junior delegation was selected last October at the New [Read more…]

Keewaydin Farm in Stowe named Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year

CN-DY-1-VT-DAIRY-FOY_011by Lisa Halvorsen, Freelance agricultural journalist for University of Vermont Extension

Keewaydin Farm, on the outskirts of Stowe village, looks like a typical Vermont dairy farm. Its tidy white farmhouse and well-maintained barns and silos suggest a farm rooted in tradition.

But owners Les and Claire Pike are quick to embrace innovation, being among the first in the state to adopt the latest technology on their 141-head registered Jersey farm. They’re also passionate about their animals, their land and keeping their farm viable for the next generation, all reasons why this farm was selected as the 2015 Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year. [Read more…]