Horses coming in at the 50th Equine Affaire

CEW-MR-2-Equine affaire115by Laura Rodley

If Santa Claus was going to leave just one thing in a horse-lover’s stocking, since, of course, a live horse wouldn’t fit, it would be tickets to next year’s Equine Affaire. This year’s 50th Equine Affaire, held in Springfield, MA was a feast for the eyes with items to buy, from state-of-the-art saddles and horse vacations, to getting a chance to touch live horses over in the Breed Pavilion. Attendees could take notes during presentations by Pat Parelli, Jim Masterson, Karen Daley and Mark Rashid among many others, and in the evening, had the opportunity to watch horses perform during Fantasia. [Read more…]

A great grain alternative

CM-MR-2-Milo3110by Sally Colby

Milo, also known as grain sorghum, is grown widely throughout the Midwest and used in livestock rations. It’s not as popular in the Northeast, but some farmers are giving it a second look.

Milo belongs to the same botanical family as corn, and has a similar upright habit. It has a higher protein level than corn, but is lower in fat and vitamin A. Prior to the 1940s, grain sorghum grew to five to seven feet, which meant problems at harvest time. Modern grain sorghums have dwarfing genes and reach between two and four feet at maturity. [Read more…]

WOTUS: Where every molecule of water can earn a fine

CEW-MR-1-WOTUS1240by Steve Wagner

Welcome to the wonderful world of WOTUS. That acronym stands for Waters of the United States. As is often necessary, political outrage spawns acronyms because the term in question is likely to be around for a long time and is thus easier to reference. [Read more…]

All about Dorper sheep

???????????????????????????????by Sanne Kure-Jensen

Dorper breeds were developed in the 1930s and ‘40s, and were officially recognized in South Africa in 1946. The fast-growing, well-muscled Dorpers are a cross between Horned Dorset rams and Blackhead Persian ewes. Dorper Sheep are typically docile and require minimal labor to manage. [Read more…]