Aspen Ridge Farm: naturally-raised meats

CE-MR-2-Aspen-Ridge-by Tamara Scully

Hidden down an old dirt road, Aspen Ridge Farm is home to Meredith and Bucky Acly, their two young children, and the assorted livestock they raise in rural Warren County, New Jersey. The 25-acre farm, located in Oxford, is home to pastured broilers, laying hens, pigs, dairy cow, veal calves, and Icelandic sheep. [Read more…]

Successful urban farmers use intensive agriculture

CN-MR-1-Urban farmersby Sanne Kure-Jensen

There are many benefits to farming in urban areas. Most urban farmers enjoy being close to their markets and customers. They also spend less time and money transporting goods to customers than rural growers. Urban sites generally offer easy access to potable water. Most urban farmers have fewer wildlife problems than their rural counterparts. Urban environments also tend to be 6 – 8 degrees warmer than rural areas. This is partly due to the heat island effect of pavement and sidewalks. [Read more…]

Raising cattle for the future, today

CEW-MR-3-Equity Angus1by Sally Colby

Rich Brown says five generations on all sides of his family tree have been in some kind of livestock business, so it’s natural that he’d continue the tradition.

Brown’s involvement with beef cattle began at his parents’ farm in Antwerp, NY. “I was working off the farm,” he said. “My parents were no longer milking, and the pastures were growing up in brush. I decided it made sense to put beef cattle there.” Brown put five registered Angus heifers on the farm in 1995, and in 2000, moved to Port Byron, NY, to grow the herd. [Read more…]

Grasstravaganza 2014 promotes love of the land through understanding

CEW-MR-3-Grasstravaganza3by Troy Bishopp

MORRISVILLE, NY — Aldo Leopold once said, “When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” This sentiment was an overarching theme at the three-day Grasstravaganza 2014 event that brought 150 farmers, ag educators and conservation professionals together to peer deeply into soil health, pasture productivity and creating wealth by nurturing the land. [Read more…]

Cover crops prove to be a good management tool for vegetable growers

CEW-MR-2-Cover Crops1by Elizabeth A. Tomlin

Cover crops should be a part of every vegetable farmer’s toolbox. That’s the message that Thomas Björkman, Associate Professor of Vegetable Crop Physiology with Cornell University explained to attendees of a vegetable grower’s meeting and workshop that took place near Fort Plain, NY.
Since vegetable production compromises soil health, which directly affects productivity, building and maintaining soil is a priority for vegetable producers.

“One management goal that is central for many vegetable farmers is maintaining good tilth, which is accomplished in part by always feeding soil microorganism with fresh organic matter,” Björkman explained. “Cover crops can provide that organic matter between vegetables.” [Read more…]